Effie Brenner

Ceramic Artist

Inspired by the Native American Indians, Effie hand builds her one-of-a-kind vessels using the ancient coil method. “I pay meticulous attention to the form and surface of each one of my ceramic pieces.”

The artist and her husband, Barry, have three grown sons and live in Pennsylvania. Effie earned a degree in Interior Design from the Art Institute of Pittsburgh and quickly established a successful design practice. Her career path was diverted in the early 1990’s when she became fully immersed in her passion for pottery after attending a workshop at a local art center.

Currently, Effie is creating from her home-based studio and teaches ceramics at Wallingford’s Community Arts Center. Effie remains an active member of the Community Arts Center’s Potter’s Guild and the Potter’s Guild Chapter of the Pennsylvania Guild of Craftsmen. 

Effie’s pieces have won numerous awards in both regional and local art shows. Effie’s works are exhibited in various galleries and are held in prominent collections both in the U.S. and abroad.

About Coiled Pottery...

Each pot is started using a small slab of clay to serve as a base. Coils are hand rolled one at a time. Ropes of coils are added piece by piece making the vessel grow taller and wider by the positioning of one coil against the previous one. As the pot evolves the walls are pinched thin and swelled, the shape refined and the surface is sanded smooth. Terra sigillata is applied to the surface of the pot. Terra sigillata is a suspension of the very finest particles of clay. The application is repeated, polishing between coats, until the piece is polished to the worn smoothness of a river stone. Next, the vessel is fired in a sawdust pit decorating the surface with smoke clouds.

The clay must be porous in order to absorb the effects of the fire. As a result, the pots are not intended to hold water.

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By Phone: 215-873-4381

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Click here to view Effie Brenner's work.